Who Can Follow the Scandinavian Diet?

Who Can Follow the Scandinavian Diet?

Who Can Follow the Scandinavian Diet?
Who Can Follow the Scandinavian Diet?

US News and World Report share very special lists of many different nutrition types or trends every year with their readers. They evaluate all kinds of innovations in subjects such as short-term weight loss, long-term weight loss, general health benefits, and add what they find appropriate to this list. In 2021, many familiar diets appear on this list, especially the Mediterranean diet, flexible diet and Weight Watchers. However, it was the Scandinavian Diet, which we are not familiar with, ranked ninth on the list.

So what exactly is the Scandinavian diet? "More vegetables and fruits, whole grains instead of refined grains, and a healthy and plant-centered diet that focuses on consuming organic and local foods as often as possible," holistic nutritionist Maria Marlowe told Vogue. and continues as follows; "The Scandinavian diet is similar to the paleo in that it focuses on real foods and high-quality animal products, but places more emphasis on plant foods and wild seafood than meat."

Think of salmon caught in the river rather than a farm, or grass-raised eggs. Wild foods are higher in nutrients and tastier, says Marlowe. "In terms of taste, wild and local foods will typically taste better because they are fresher or gather at the peak of maturity." says. "What's more, wild fruits, which form the basis of the Scandinavian diet, are generally smaller and more dense in both flavor and nutrients than the large, water-dense fruits you find in grocery stores. (A 2010 Department of Agriculture analysis revealed that wild blueberries have twice the antioxidants of farm-grown blueberries.) Other bases of the Scandinavian diet include oats, root vegetables, rapeseed oil and legumes, and oily fish such as salmon.

The health benefits are enormous. Numerous studies show that it can lower blood pressure and improve heart health. Although it should never be a goal, the Scandinavian diet promotes long-term weight loss, not short-term weight loss. So simply put, it offers a lifestyle rather than a temporary effort.

The Scandinavian diet isn't exactly a new phenomenon. People in Denmark, Iceland, Norway, Finland and Sweden have been feeding this way for centuries. However, the concept has become more familiar and formal recently. In the 2010s, Noma in Copenhagen has won the World's Best Restaurant title four times. Then came the cookbooks. In 2015, Phaidon published the Scandinavian Cookbook of Magnus Nilsson, who is said to be on the wedding program of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex. Then came the popular The Nordic Way in 2017.

Meanwhile, researchers from the University of Copenhagen collaborated with Noma to officially summarize and share the key components of the Scandinavian diet. In the new decade, Scandinavian gastronomy solidified its place as a wellness cuisine. This spring, Noma's co-founder and renowned chef Mads Refslund will renew the kitchen program and lead a rest for wellness at Water Mill's Shou Sugi Ban House on Earth Day. Refslund says it plans to use the extremely seasonal, local and wild ingredients grown on Long Island. Asparagus, kale, Spanish artichokes, currant leaves, and ferns are just a few of the ingredients on the menu. Some sample dishes they will serve? Chickpeas and nuts sprinkled with toasted rye bread and bean sprouts, grilled lettuce, Boston mackerel with salted egg yolk and grilled salmon belly with ginger and flowers from their gardens. (He also likes to mix the Scandinavian menu with Asian influences.)

Refslund points out that the Scandinavian diet goes beyond personal health. "The Scandinavian diet is predominantly plant-based, so it's easier for the environment because it requires less natural resources." he explains. “We grow most of our ingredients, eat less processed foods, and not eat as much beef as other cultures, and instead incorporate freshwater fish such as salmon, mackerel, shellfish, lean pork, veal and poultry as healthy proteins. "

The sustainability focus is perhaps behind the diet's enduring appeal. Unlike many popular eating habits, Scandinavian cooking benefits everyone, not just you. However, focusing the Scandinavian diet on local, wild, and low-impact ingredients can also present challenges. Searching for strawberries while living in the city can be a little tricky, and not all supermarkets have wild meat. "The Scandinavian diet emphasizes home cooking and local resources, which may not be practical or easy for many people," says Marlowe. he admits. "Let me tell you what principles you can take from the Scandinavian diet. For example, eating more whole vegetables and organic strawberries, eliminating refined carbohydrates and processed foods, and choosing the best quality sources of animal protein…"

Or you can copy Refslund's fridge. “I always have rye bread and various whole grains on hand; fresh fruits, leafy greens and root vegetables; eggs, nuts and seeds; and yoghurt and cheeses as well as freshwater fish ... ”